Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Fingerprints


Who made this? What was floating through her mind? What do her hands look like? What inspired her design? 

Handcrafted goods give us an irreplaceable link to the past; to tradition; to an individual. The pottery we recently got in the shop are signed by the artists from the Casas Grandes and Mata Ortiz pueblos of Mexico which are very close to one another. These are communities of indigenous peoples that have lived there for centuries. 

All materials and tools originate from supplies that are readily available locally and the process of making this pottery is from the ancient pottery traditions of the region. Amazingly, the pottery is hand-built without using a potter's wheel. You can imagine the talent and patience that goes into creating the perfect and artful shapes of the pots or ollas. 

You can buy these collectibles at http://soulsingboutique.com/collections/decor.

Saturday, October 20, 2012

JAMS!

We have been listening to Calexico's new album, Algiers, on repeat in the shop! It's released on October 30 but we're listening on Spotify ;)


Friday, October 19, 2012

Drop by!

The shop is finally CLEANED up and running smoothly! We were sort of open last week, but if you came in and saw all the books all over the floor you might have run in the other direction! It's looking good in here, so come by this weekend from 10:30-5pm and we'll help you find a treasure!

This amazing art deco lady (a twin!) used to be a lamp. They are just fabulous!

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Harvest Time

       October always hearkens the the end of the growing season as the summer Sun fades, to darken a little earlier in the day.
The Sun, like our hearts and dreams, inevitably sinks a little lower on our horizons, every year at this time: Offering us his shorter days and taunting us with his hard wisdom and cold lessons.
"Slow down, warm up and rest; For every end there will be a new beginning." This is the law of the natural world and Time is always a relative quantification!
 The scarcity of Time is only a shared perception, like the cultural madness that surrounds us every day; exasperated by our accustomed habits and assumed duties; Let go, and live and work onwards with Nature. Yet, we lament the passing of our garden sanctuaries and miss the seemingly endless hours spent working in the fields of our fancy: tending, to our beloved animals, flowers, fruits and vegetables. There is fertile ground still left to tend!
Dreamtime beckons our return. The Ice Queen doth cometh, and our Winter playgrounds will return soon. Chin up, Cheer up!  Here is a photo montage of our Summer playground and our sanctuary from the maddening crowd. Twas a glorious Harvest!

Autumn Morning Sun




Roasting Peppers

Herb Garden

Peppers Galore

Reserves


Kale

Transformation

Bringin in Dinner

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                                                                      Fall Song

Another year gone, leaving everywhere
its rich spiced residues: vines, leaves,
the uneaten fruits crumbling damplyin the shadows, unmattering back
from the particular island of this summer, this NOW, that now is nowhere
except underfoot, moldering in that black subterranean castle
of unobservable mysteries -- roots and sealed seedsand the wanderings of water. This
I try to remember when time's measurepainfully chafes, for instance when autumn
flares out at the last, boisterous and like us longingto stay -- how everything lives, shifting
from one bright vision to another, foreverin these momentary pastures.

~ Mary Oliver ~
(American Primitive)

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Embracing the Darkness

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Fall is my favorite season of the year, and it has been so chilly here in Colorado for the past week or so. After an incredibly hot summer, the weather is very welcome. The aspens are changing and the days are getting shorter and we are all trying to adjust to the change of seasons.
It is always like holding my breath as I move into the fall time. I love the weather, the scent, the crunchy leaves, and lighting fires, but it is a rude awakening to end the day much earlier and leave work in the dark.
As we move into the darkest time of year, and a hard transition, it is most important to take care of ourselves and listen to what our bodies and souls really need.
*Breathe, Smile, Relax.

Friday, September 7, 2012

As if for the first time

Cross-posted from Carrie Jordan's Blog

 Photography by Amanda Charchian


 Photography by Amanda Charchian
 Photography by Amanda Charchian


He looked around as if seeing the world for the first time. Beautiful was the world, colorful was the world, bizarre and enigmatic was the world! There was blue, there was yellow, there was green. Sky flowed and river, forest jutted and mountain: everything was beautiful, everything enigmatic and magical.
–Sidhartha
Re-reading a journal from three years ago, I came across this passage I had written down from Herman Hesse's Sidhartha.
We should wake up each day and look around as if seeing the world for the first time. There is so much to be grateful for.
I have been experiencing a range of emotions the past couple of weeks because I am downsizing and moving to a studio in a nearby mountain town. Leaving my wonderful bungalo apartment that I have made my home for two years is very sad. As I get ready to sell most of my things this weekend, sifting through memories and textures, I am excited, sad, nostolgic, and grateful. I have so much, and it is quite a #firstworldproblem that I don't want to part with my things. But this is an exercise that makes me feel alive. And I am excited to start over. 

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Put a crown on it

Cross-posted from carriejordanstudio.com.

Every girl deserves to feel like a princess...Making a flower or feather crown is a fun way to celebrate the last parts of summer!











Saturday, August 4, 2012

Books to feed your mind and decorate your home

Photo: A classic and unrivaled work by America's preeminent historian Francis Parkman. Fine leather bindings for the distinguished private library. 
The Book of One Thousand and One Nights. Stories by various authors. Translated from the original Arabic by John Payne. Khorassan Edition (Limited to 500 copies. Number 260 out of 500). London. 1901. 15 volume set complete. Illustrated with gravure plates throughout. The Book of One Thousand and One Nights is a collection of Middle Eastern and South Asian stories and folk tales compiled in Arabic during the Islamic Golden Age. It is often known in English as the Arabian Nights. Stories were collected over many centuries by various authors, translators and scholars across the Middle East, Central Asia and North Africa. The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Indian, Turkish, Egyptian and Mesopotamian folklore and literature. Many tales were originally folk stories from the Caliphate era. 

Queen of the Meadow

Cross-posted from carriejordanstudio.com.
A couple of weeks ago, I was totally out of facial moisturizer. In a dry desert climate, that is a very bad thing! I searched around at Whole Foods to try and find something natural, but everything was $50 or not up to my standards. Later at the Boulder Farmer's Market, I came across a fairy lady from Switzerland who now lives in Fort Collins, CO. She is Queen of the Meadow
Photos from queenofthemeadow.com
I bought this amazing night lotion (no SPF) which is made totally of natural oils and for only $15. The oil is so light and hydrating, not at all sticky or thick. It is also: 
  • anti-aging
  • non-sticky
  • light oils
  • fast absorbing
  • nourishing and hydrating for your skin
  • renews complexion 
  • maintains healthy cells
  • high in essential fatty acids
Queen of the Meadow is a family business in Fort Collins, CO that creates all natural, organic hair and body care products. The ingredients for their products are wild gathered or organically grown and they even give you $1 off your next purchase if you refill your glass bottle instead of recyle or throw it away. 
What a beautiful way to live and work. I highly recommend these products!

Thursday, August 2, 2012

Beads, Beads, Beads...


Vintage "Dutch Tomato" trade bead necklace; Beads are about 200 years old. The beads were originally manufactured in Venice, Italy on the magic Island of Murano which sits right off the Venetian harbor. Most Venetian trade beads were made there, and eventually ended up in Africa, South East Asia, and North and South America through the trade routes of the great Venetian navigators and merchants. Dutch Tomato beads are a type of seed bead that were traded a lot during the African slave trade, and served as one of the earliest forms of trade currency in that region. The indigenous people of sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere, Including Native Americans, placed a high intrinsic value on these tomato beads.  These beads were highly sought after in Africa where beads and other colorful decorative items were truly valued.  The Dutch Tomato beads were largely traded in Ethiopia where most of these beads are found today. They get their name from their color and shape and their brilliant semi- translucence. These glass beads, they have an irregular rounded shape with a brilliant luminescent shade of red. The glass beads measure roughly 5/8 inch long by 1/2 in width at center: The bead strand measures 21 inches of actual beads. There are 36 total beads which are all in good condition with no cracks. Some pitting to glass and a well worn and polished patina.  



 Vintage Venetian "American Flag" Red, White and Blues Trade Bead Necklace. A beautiful strand of 59 "American Flag" beads, manufactured in Venice during the first or second quarter of the 19th century.  Beads measure roughly 1/2 inch each and the total beaded part of the strand measures 26 inches, with 2 inches of exposed raffia at the clasp end. The strand weighs roughly 9 ounces.The Red, White, and Blue, Venetian beads were traded extensively in Africa throughout the nineteenth century, where they were truly valued by many different indigenous tribes. These "American Flag" beads were traded mostly in Sub-Saharan African countries. Venetian beads were used as a trading currency in Africa up until Colonial times when Western European currencies eventually displaced local currencies.  Today, antique Venetian beads are still rare and valuable, but are mostly collected by Westerners who value their high level of craftsmanship, beauty and scarcity.  Each bead is hand-made and unique. This strand is in good shape with moderate wear and a nice vintage patina from years of wear.

Vintage banded agate trade bead necklace. A beautiful strand of  16 beads. Each bead measures roughly 1 1/4 inches.  Beaded part of the strand measures 22 inches total with 4 inches of wrapped cotton at clasp end of the necklace. Probably mined and hand cut in Egypt in the last quarter of the 19th century, or at the beginning of the 20th century. The strand weighs roughly 3 1/2 ounces.  Banded agate trade beads were traded extensively throughout Africa, where they were truly valued and prized by many different indigenous peoples, beginning with the Ancient Egyptians who prized banded agate above many other precious and semi-precious stones. These semi-precious stone beads were traded mostly in Sub-Saharan African countries. Trade beads were used as a trading currency in Africa up until Colonial times when Western European currencies eventually displaced local currencies.  Today, antique trade beads are still rare and valuable, but are mostly collected by Westerners who value their high level of craftsmanship, beauty and scarcity.  Each bead is hand-made and unique. This strand is in good shape with moderate wear, a few hairline cracks, and a nice vintage patina from years of wear. Please contact daisyponcho@gmail.com if you have any questions or would like to purchase one of these beautiful strands of vintage trade beads.

Thursday, July 26, 2012

New Arrivals in the Soul*Sing Boutique

      Daisy and Poncho are pleased to offer a small selection of beautiful, vintage, Guatemalan Huipils, which are the traditional blouses that Mayan women and their daughters in Guatemala have worn for centuries. They are still the traditional attire of indigenous Guatemalans and a few other Latin American Mayan cultures today. These beautiful blouses are of great cultural significance to contemporary Mayan culture, and help to identify the individual personality and the village from where the wearer lives, as well as her marital, social and religious status. The patterns and meanings on the huipils harken back to the days of Ancient Mayan civilization and have remained the same over the years. They represent a spiritual continuity from their noble past to the present day, and are worn with pride and dignity in everyday life, as well as for ceremonial purposes or special familial occasions.
      Guatemalan huipils have been hand-woven on a traditional back strap loom for centuries. The looms and weaving techniques have been passed down from mother to daughter through the years. Guatemalan weavers use raw wool or cotton that they wash, comb and spin as their starting panels and then weave and often embroider/brocade brightly colored yarns into the panels as they work. The process is actually called brocade, which is different than embroidery,  where the colored threads are stitched into the completed garment. The use of indigenous dyes from flowers, plants, insects, bark, and berries give these blouses a beautiful and brightly colored aura of individual intensity that you can see in these fine examples of Mayan weaving. Huipils are considered works of art  and can sometimes take months to complete.  Artisans in Guatemala often make and sell huipils to help to support their families and improve their living conditions, but they are also a traditional part of Mayan culture and are worn widely among the natives of Guatemala. They will continue to reflect femininity, identity, and tradition of Mayan culture for many generations to come.

Beautiful Guatemalan childrens huipil ca. 1950's. Price: 65.00 USD
    

Beautiful Guatemalan childrens huipil ca. 1950's. Price: 65.00 USD

Beautiful Guatemalan, vintage, brocaded huipil circa 1950's. From the San Pedro Sacatepeguez region. Price 250.00

Beautiful, Guatemalan, vintage, brocaded, huipil circa 1950's. From the Chajul region. Price 250.00

Beautiful, Guatamalan, vintage, brocaded, huipil circa 1950's. From the Patzun region. Price 200.00

Beautiful, Guatemalan, vintage, brocaded, huipil circa 1950's. From the  San Martin Jilotepeque region. Price 175.00

 Please contact daisyponcho@gmail.com if you have any questions or would like to purchase one of these beautiful, vintage, Mayan huipils. 

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

shine on


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Photo by Jessica J Wiley


via pinterest

editorial for elle france, july 2012. daria werbowy photographed by cass bird. styled by anne-marie brouillet. 


editorial for elle france, july 2012. daria werbowy photographed by cass bird. styled by anne-marie brouillet. 


editorial for elle france, july 2012. daria werbowy photographed by cass bird. styled by anne-marie brouillet. 


editorial for elle france, july 2012. daria werbowy photographed by cass bird. styled by anne-marie brouillet. 

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Glitter/sequins/sparkles are definitely one of my favorite things to wear because it's so FUN! You almost feel like you're not supposed to because sequins so eighties and flashy—but so feminine and other-worldly at the same time. Any sequined piece looks great paired with regular clothes like a t-shirt and jean jacket. The contrast of flashy with relaxed is really captivating and a great outfit for a daytime walkabout town that shines into the nighttime.